how to avoid diabetes with diet

Wouldn’t say it doesn’t help; actually, it will probably help a lot of people. a 40% discount is huge, when you’re otherwise facing a full price tag thanks to a high deductible you haven’t met. If you need insulin and can pay $330 instead of $800 for three vials for a month, and just basically sidestep insurance for a bit… yeah, that’s something. Obviously, this is basically a “band-aid” in many ways. But it’s one of many efforts underway on the bigger insurance-related and policy discussions, but it certainly can help, Why can’t they make it affordable to everyone? Giving free insulin or discounted doesn’t make sense, it drives up the overall cost! Reduce the price overall, With a 75-year old T1D mother, I care MOST about getting FAIR insurance coverage and endocrinologists who actually give a rip about and keep on top of latest empowering technology to provide a predictable and safe life for T1Ds.
What about us T1’s…and having to go through your doctor to see results is nothing short of horseshit, That’s the whole point of Professional CGMs, which are a debatable item. Some agree they serve a purpose, some don’t. But that debate aside, it’s what the iPro2 is — and that’s what this myLog is built around. NOW, with that being said, we can assume that this same mobile health tech will be weaved into MedT’s plans going forward as it comes out with other apps and tools, like the SugarIQ cognitive app. We’ll see. -Mike,  Importantly, there is a $80-100 cost to buy the meter and tech services up front. One Drop tells us this about pricing and access: “Right now, One Drop is direct-to-consumer, so no insurance or Rx required. We are not covered by Medicare or any other insurance, but your total out-of-pocket expense for the One Drop | Premium subscription service is $33-$40 per month (roughly the same as a co-pay) for un-limited test strips and 24/7 diabetes support from Certified Diabetes Educators. We hope to work with insurance companies in the future to provide our devices and services at no cost to our customers, and we’ll let you know as soon as we do.
Livongo does this already. I am on their 2 year pilot program for $25 a month. Unlimited test strips, lancets, coaching by CDEs, and they contact you if you have a low or high to make sure you are taking care of it. The starter kit, which had a meter, lancets and test strips was free, Understood. The materials for Livongo aren’t clear — it doesn’t describe the coaching feature as something you can do “in app” via the mobile app. And after going through the process of reaching out to Livongo to ask what the online account log-in is, and then using that to download the app, I see you’re correct in the in-app email feature to a coach. Really, the app “closes the loop” on the Livongo features; just wondering why it’s not more visible to newbies setting,  It will be interesting to see how well they do with getting test strip supplies to customers and just how reliable and accessible the CDE’s are. It sounds like a good deal but only time will tell whether they have fine-tuned the logistics and can deliver on their promises. My curiosity is piqued.
I’m suspicious of the unlimited test strip claim. That seems like a great way to go bankrupt. They must ensure the strips are actually being used (versus sold), possibly by sending strips based on how many results are uploaded to the cloud? In that case I hope they have high reliability so strips aren’t lost to error and provide enough leeway to account for vacations and shipping time, Any word on accuracy? Are they compliant with the 20% error range or have they chosen to meet greater accuracy than that, Based on your usage, we will send you all the strips you need. So if you are testing 300x per month (10x per day) and syncing all of those readings to the app with your meter, you will get 300 strips per month. There is no limit, as long as you’re using your strips and syncing with the app. And if there’s ever an issue, just reach out! We’ll work together to make sure you’re covered. We’re in this together!
Not necessarily what Danielle describes, as it’s often used synonymously with “outcomes-based” pricing — which is looking at effects a particular medication has on someone’s health (A1C lowering, glucose variability, other outcomes, etc). So, if an insulin is determined to do better for people, it will be priced accordingly, I don’t like the term “value based” (I pretty much value my insulin as much as I value my life) and I hate the latest industry buzzword “outcomes”, which simply circumvents a company’s means and methods, If you’re going to focus on an “outcome” of acceptable pricing to me, you’re disregarding all of the negotiation, manipulation, and second- and third-payers that happen behind the scenes. Focusing on outcomes doesn’t solve the fundamental problems, it masks them – which is the complete opposite of transparency. Focusing on outcomes is a purely Machiavellian approach which will create more holes than it solves. I’m not a fan – not at all.
No anti-rejection drugs and 5-year life, we’ll take that! May the best encapsulation device get to market,  Iv lost faith in DRI with their premature announcement when the whole Biohub thing startedOne dollar out of seven that they take in comes from the Diabetes Industry. Leaning on Congress to put pressure on insulin manufacturers is convenient: they look like they did something, Congress has bigger fish to fry and the status quo continues.

Michelle Cervantes

Michelle Cervantes

Hi, I'm Michelle and I am a committed campaigner for the promotion of healthier lifestyles. I love my mom, I've tried to have a healthier lifestyle for my mom. Everyone should be happy and healthy life

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