how to beat diabetes

Prime Therapeutics mailed me a letter that my Novolog was covered (after Blue Cross told me it wasn’t), then mailed a second letter 2 weeks later that I had to fail Humalog or Humulin before Novolog would be covered. So now I will switch to Humalog and hope it doesn’t crystallize in my pump, Aetna charges me my full deductible everyone I order, then an additional 5k after that.
So, if I order meds the first day of my new insurance year they will charge me 5k, waiting to order until payday as they are charging what’s left of Caremark was a NIGHTMARE to deal with! We had to use them for all of our “maintenance” meds with my hubby’s previous employer. Getting my son’s Humira took tons of phone calls, then they shifted to a different distributor and didn’t transfer ANY of his information, meaning more phone calls. They didn’t even let us know beforehand, and all of this resulted in him going two weeks without his meds. Getting my diabetes supplies and insulin was as slow and frustrating as getting his Humira. I LOATHE CVS, they constantly told me something wasn’t covered when it WAS, and they overcharged me for many meds that I had copay assistance Cards for. I hate them with a passion.
Yes, tons cvs caremark has removed a ton of medications from their formularies this year, so has express scripts they will tell you what you can take cause they aint payin for it, I have found that mail order is so much cheaper. I go through CVS/Caremark but make sure not to keep a card in file or they will fill a prescription and charge you even if you don’t have the money,  Express Scripts denied my Victoza 2 weeks ago. How do they have power over what my doctor wants me to take? I’m already taking Lantus. This substitute was tanzeum but I had to go online and print some kind of paper coupon. It was completely ridiculous and it took a week to find the workaround.
We exchanged several emails in response to your request for an interview. The presence of a click-through link to the Hagens Berman website on the DiabetesMine home page indicated an editorial bias in favor of their class action, about which we have publicly raised concerns. You refused our offer to do a Q&A on reasonable terms, e.g. not embedded in a negative article, Our LinkedIn profiles, which you apparently chose not to consult, are public. Our medical information is private, and we may not wish to share it for the first time in an interview with a publication or journalist who may have adverse intent or conflict of interest, Linking to a lawsuit filed by the law firm is not a bias, it’s directing people to the actual suit to read for themselves. And we will have to disagree on “reasonable” — pre-screening Q’s, selective answering of questions you determine as “negative,” prior review is not how most journalists operate. Anyhow, good luck with your efforts. And thanks for bringing attention to the line of litigation, as well as important questions that should be asked of these cases and counsel.
I never knew this existed! I like the idea of not having to do a site change every 2-3 days…. and for this, instead of going in to the Dr. to have refilled, maybe make it much more user friendly by having a way for us to refill home, sometimes taking off time off of work is difficult for people, But I love this! I once had to wear my site for almost 3 weeks because I couldn’t afford more supplies. It came out twice and I had to risk infection by inserting it back where it came out of. Wasn’t able to pay for a back up source of insulin at the time either. I have insurance now, so that won’t happen again, God forbid. This just seems so much more time and cost efficient, God save us from another Diabetes Civil War. Could we not just all agree that Diabetes is a constant challenge and is as indivualized as each different person it lives in?
That’s what makes this Disease so hard – it’s a shape shifter. Yet we keep trying to put in in specific boxes, There are clearly some people that make ketones more easily, have more blood glucose swings, or don’t feel highs or lows. This does not make them brittle, it simply means changes need to be made to their treatment. Perhaps, they are on the wrong brand of insulin (some work more rapidly than others), or maybe they over treat lows. They may need a pump to deal with dawn phenomenon or varying basal rates, or they could need a CGM to help prevent lows. It’s easy to make an excuse for why blood sugars aren’t more stable, but more often than not, I would say it’s due to the doctor (or patient) not wanting to put in the work. I absolutely get that diabetes sucks (my husband and 2 of our 3 kids have T1) and some are harder to control that others (I have a boy just entering puberty and a girl solidly in the middle of it), but effort has a lot to do with it.
You only get out what you put it. That goes for both patients and doctors, Dr Bernstein “I don’t like the phrase “brittle diabetic” because there is only one type of diabetic that is brittle, where their blood sugars can vary at random, and that is someone with gastroparesis. The ADA approach to treating diabetes with a lot of carbohydrates and industrial doses of medication cannot generate level blood sugars. It’s of a necessity that it is going to generate rollercoaster blood sugars and the term “brittle” is applied to the rollercoaster blood sugars, which is totally avoidable by most of us who don’t have gastroparesis. You have to have normal blood sugars. I don’t know if you are brittle because of the treatment you are getting, or because you have gastroparesis. You could read the chapter about gastroparesis in my book, Diabetes Solution, to see what has to be done, and what some of the tricks are to normalize blood sugars if you have gastroparesis.

Michelle Cervantes

Michelle Cervantes

Hi, I'm Michelle and I am a committed campaigner for the promotion of healthier lifestyles. I love my mom, I've tried to have a healthier lifestyle for my mom. Everyone should be happy and healthy life

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